DUP, University Road, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
(+255) 738 921 648

Dar es Salaam University Press (DUP)

dup

 
 

RECENT PUBLICATIONS 2023

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Aman Mdewa (PhD) is a fast-paced and dynamic academician and leader at the University of Dar es Salaam Business School (UDBS) with experience in different countries and organizations. He started his career at KPMG as an auditor in 2013. He also has experience as an economist at the Bank of Tanzania (BoT), a research fellow at UNCTAD, and a lecturer at Manchester Metropolitan University in different capacities including internship, contract and fixed employment. His training and experience in policy analysis at the United Nations Conference for Trade and Development (UNCTAD), in Geneva Switzerland have equipped him to examine macroeconomic, trade and investment conditions in formulating development policies. He gained more experience in evidence-based policy analysis through his recent PhD thesis work in the United Kingdom (UK) which assessed the influence of progress towards the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) on the Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) flows in Sub- Saharan African countries. Currently, Aman is Lecturing at UDBS covering micro and macroeconomics, development and investment banking and International Business finance. Aman is passionate about innovation and utilizing fresh thinking to solve economic development challenges in Tanzania and the globe.

Our Profile

 Historical Background

Dar es Salaam University Press (DUP) has its roots back in the 1960s when it was part of the University of Dar es Salaam Library services. DUP was then known as Library Technical Services Unit which was responsible for all printing and providing technical-related services related to printing and publishing to support the University library. The unit dealt also with activities such as binding and photocopying book chapters with the use of instructors. In 1979, the Library Technical Services unit was transformed into DUP, which among others was aimed to provide publishing and printing services to meet the needs of the University’s academic community. DUP was transformed from a unit in the University Library to a separate business centre within the University. The changes in the printing industry in Tanzania between 1979 to 1988, which among other things, witnessed the increase in the importation of paper and related materials and changes in the policies, were not reflected in DUP’s operations set-up. The DUP services have remained in the domain of the University of Dar es Salaam (UDSM) market due to its potential, and given its current status, due to lack of ability to serve the external market. From 1987 to 1990, DUP was under a rehabilitation programme financed by various donor organizations to rescue its position by addressing the critical problems at that time. In August 1996, DUP was incorporated under the companies’ ordinance Cap 212 into a limited company in order to give it more autonomy and ability to run commercially in order to generate funds for itself as well as an income for the University. This was done alongside other initiatives to make the University independent from the businesses and to establish sustainable business operations for DUP in order to serve both the UDSM market and the external market. It was anticipated that the move would attract investors and induce more publishing operations and distribution of books, research information and other literacy materials

 Historical Background

Dar es Salaam University Press (DUP) has its roots back in the 1960s when it was part of the University of Dar es Salaam Library services. DUP was then known as Library Technical Services Unit which was responsible for all printing and providing technical-related services related to printing and publishing to support the University library. The unit dealt also with activities such as binding and photocopying book chapters with the use of instructors. In 1979, the Library Technical Services unit was transformed into DUP, which among others was aimed to provide publishing and printing services to meet the needs of the University’s academic community. DUP was transformed from a unit in the University Library to a separate business centre within the University. The changes in the printing industry in Tanzania between 1979 to 1988, which among other things, witnessed the increase in the importation of paper and related materials and changes in the policies, were not reflected in DUP’s operations set-up. The DUP services have remained in the domain of the University of Dar es Salaam (UDSM) market due to its potential, and given its current status, due to lack of ability to serve the external market. From 1987 to 1990, DUP was under a rehabilitation programme financed by various donor organizations to rescue its position by addressing the critical problems at that time. In August 1996, DUP was incorporated under the companies’ ordinance Cap 212 into a limited company in order to give it more autonomy and ability to run commercially in order to generate funds for itself as well as an income for the University. This was done alongside other initiatives to make the University independent from the businesses and to establish sustainable business operations for DUP in order to serve both the UDSM market and the external market. It was anticipated that the move would attract investors and induce more publishing operations and distribution of books, research information and other literacy materials.

DUP Vision
“To become a modern University Press providing high-quality scholarly publications for inclusive and sustainable development”.

DUP Mission
“To support advancement of intellectual wealth within Tanzania and beyond through high-quality publications using modern technologies and facilities”.

DUP’s Theme/Motto
All activities of DUP will be guided by the following Motto: “Knowledge Generation for Academic Excellence”

DUP’s Core Values
In order to achieve its Vision, DUP will be guided by the following core values: Integrity (I), Motivation (M), Professionalism (P), Academic Excellence (A), Creativity (C) and Transparency (T)- IMPACT. In short, DUP aims to bring IMPACT through the production and dissemination of knowledge within Tanzania and beyond.

Publishing Stages

publishing stages

Publishing Workflow
Assessment
This is the first process in which the manuscript is examined by an editor or the whole editorial team to see if it is publishable or not following DUP guidelines. When it is confirmed that the manuscript is publishable and henceforth accepted for publication, the client is informed and DUP decides whether the accepted manuscript needs an external reviewer or not. This process normally takes 1 day to 2 weeks.

Reviewing 

If the manuscript needs an external reviewer, it is then sent to the anonymous reviewer – an expert in the field. Once a reviewer has assessed the work, s/he is supposed to write a report to the client guiding him/her on how to improve his/her manuscript.  Upon the receipt of the reviewer’s comments and report, DUP editor in charge of the manuscript checks them and then submits both the report and the manuscript with the reviewer’s comments to the client on behalf of DUP after being given a go-ahead by the Manager.  Immediately after working on the reviewer’s comments both in the report and the manuscript, the client is expected to send his/her work back to DUP for further publishing processes. The reviewer is normally given a maximum of two months from the date s/he received the manuscript. 

 
Editing

As pointed out in (ii) above, once the client has worked on all the reviewer’s comments, his or her work enters into this editing stage. After the editing is completed, the manuscript is sent to the client with track changes. The client should accept all or at least 80% of the changes made to his/her manuscript and work on all comments given by the editor. Then s/he can submit the modified version back to DUP. Upon the satisfaction of the client’s modified version, the editor can pass the manuscript to the typesetter. Normally, the editor can work on 20 to 30 pages per day for substantive editing. Thus, editing a manuscript of 200 pages, for instance, can take 10 days or even a month to be accomplished because the editor needs to go back and forth for satisfaction before submitting the manuscript to the client.

Typesetting
 
Once the editing is over, the manuscript gets to this typesetting stage. This can take 1 to 3 days depending on the nature and size of the manuscript. 
 
Proofreading
 
This is the final stage in which the editor is now working on the manuscript which is complete by simply looking at the format and minor grammatical errors that may seem obvious after the typesetting. This could take a week or even a month to be accomplished. This is because the proofreading is done twice: first, it is done immediately after typesetting before the manuscript is submitted for sample printing; and second, it is done after the printing of the sample before the production of mass printing.
 
Cover Designing

This can be done at any publishing stage (at the beginning, middle or at the end). The designer works on this in collaboration with both the editor and the client. The design becomes complete only upon the agreement and satisfaction of the designer, editor and client. This can take a maximum of three days unless the client needs to change the design at the last stage. This might take a week.